Shami Chakrabarti: on Liberty

A dangerous woman” The Sun

Shami Chakrabarti is mostly known for being the director of Liberty, a British organization cross party-no party, that promotes the defense of human rights. Chakrabarti is at Liberty since 2001; ever since she has been declaring that human rights in western societies specifically in Britain are under heavy pressure; a growing hostile feeling is spreading everywhere as a consequence of mass immigration, not to mention the state of fear caused by the tragic events of 2001. Governments have tried to work around human rights and Liberty counteracted by guarding them through influencing the public debate, and raising awareness around them.
In this attempt Liberty under the guide of Chakrabarti intervened in parliamentary work and provided free legal advise and assistance. Chakrabarti made clear that human rights ( that are freedom from slavery, arbitrary imprisonment, torture, of speech, association and belief became object of the Law after WW2 in an answer to the horrors of the Holocaust. The mindset that made the Holocaust possible is still present and people can not afford to lose sight of the potential consequences. Fighting for human rights means fighting for values that apply to everybody, they are not for citizens but for human beings; more so considering that today the world is shrinking and interconnected. People have bashed the package of human rights but everyone believes in it when they need protection. It is necessary to resist political cynicism if one believes in freedom.
Chakrabarti thinks also that gender justice is a human right issue; she endorses women empowerment and thinks that women must be more confident and challenge sexism through sarcasm or formal complain.

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Harriet Tubman, highway to freedom

mah  people mus’go free

Harriet Tubman

harriet-tubman2-library-of-congress-600Another example of perseverance, symbol of freedom and independence is Harriet Tubman. Like Sojourner Truth Tubam (1819/20-1913) was born in slavery and escaped from slavery when she was 25: “[…] the sun came like gold through the trees , and over the fields, and I felt like I was in heaven[…]”.

She didn’t leave the slaves behind though. Harriet Tubman became one of the most popular conductor of the Underground Rail Road, a secret road for the slaves to walk from the Southern states of U.S.A. to the free states of Canada: “[…] her success was wonderful […] she seemed totaly devoid of personal fear[…] images-4yet she would not suffer one of her party to whimper once about giving out and going back” because “a live runaway could do a great harm by going back[…]” and  she was bluntly convinced that: “[…] a dead Negro tell no tales[…] “. She worked so efficiently that the reward for her capture went as higimages-6h as $40,000.

Tubman met many times with John Brown and during the Civil War worked for the Union Army as a soldier a spy and a nurse.

After the Civil War she remained active by helping old and indigent black persons and fighting for human rights.

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When she died in 1913 she was awarded with military honor.thumbs_img_1231